zerogravity_4BANNER2

Fly and explore Outer Space in this small Movement-based VR Experiment.

Use your arms to propel your body in whichever direction you want and find hidden objects around an abandoned space satellite.

zerogravity_4BANNER2

Fly and explore Outer Space in this small Movement-based VR Experiment.

Use your arms to propel your body in whichever direction you want and find hidden objects around an abandoned space satellite.

zerogravity_4BANNER2

Fly and explore Outer Space in this small Movement-based VR Experiment.

Use your arms to propel your body in whichever direction you want and find hidden objects around an abandoned space satellite.

Arrow_Space

ROLE

Game Designer /
QA / 3D Modeller

DATE

October 2016

PLATFORM

Vive Focus

SOFTWARE

Unity / Maya

Arrow_Space

ROLE

Game Designer /
QA / 3D Modeller

DATE

October 2016

PLATFORM

Vive Focus

SOFTWARE

Unity / Maya

Arrow_Space

ROLE

Game Designer /
QA / 3D Modeller

DATE

October 2016

PLATFORM

Vive Focus

SOFTWARE

Unity / Maya

ttp_01ProjectOverview

Space Flight VR is a small experiment made to test out and learn how to adapt various game elements in a VR environment.
Our main goal was to answer the following question: What are intuitive ways for the player to move around in VR, without using disorientating methods?

The general problem we wanted to solve was as follows: In most Virtual Reality games, the player can teleport to a different location by pointing at and selecting an area to teleport to, but players have to stand still and can get nauseated by doing this.
This can confuse the player and make it harder for you to immerse yourself in the virtual world.

After a couple of smaller prototypes, we found that a zero-gravity simulation worked best for our goal.
The idea was that the player has total freedom to move around in space to find new planets just by using their arms to propel their body forwards and back.

The player can do this by using two Vive Controllers to thrust their body through space.
Each controller button pushes the player opposite in the direction opposite of where it’s pointed to give the feeling of rocket-propelled movement.
The player can now move around while still standing still by using their arms to influence their directional movement.
This small action makes the player’s movement feel more immersive and also gives them the feeling that they’ve just moved through an extensive area.

We also developed a small game setting to strengthen this experience and emphasize the game’s mechanics.
The player wakes up on an abandoned space satellite and is free to explore wherever they want.
They can find hidden objects by exploring around, which we placed around the space satellite to further motivate the player to experiment with this new method of movement.

Space Flight VR is a small experiment made to test out and learn how to adapt various game elements in a VR environment.
Our main goal was to answer the following question: What are intuitive ways for the player to move around in VR, without using disorientating methods?

The general problem we wanted to solve was as follows: In most Virtual Reality games, the player can teleport to a different location by pointing at and selecting an area to teleport to, but players have to stand still and can get nauseated by doing this.
This can confuse the player and make it harder for you to immerse yourself in the virtual world.

After a couple of smaller prototypes, we found that a zero-gravity simulation worked best for our goal.
The idea was that the player has total freedom to move around in space to find new planets just by using their arms to propel their body forwards and back.

The player can do this by using two Vive Controllers to thrust their body through space.
Each controller button pushes the player opposite in the direction opposite of where it’s pointed to give the feeling of rocket-propelled movement.
The player can now move around while still standing still by using their arms to influence their directional movement.
This small action makes the player’s movement feel more immersive and also gives them the feeling that they’ve just moved through an extensive area.

We also developed a small game setting to strengthen this experience and emphasize the game’s mechanics.
The player wakes up on an abandoned space satellite and is free to explore wherever they want.
They can find hidden objects by exploring around, which we placed around the space satellite to further motivate the player to experiment with this new method of movement.

Explore the vast open space and find hidden items around the abandoned space satellite.
ttl_02Development

On Space Flight VR, I was a Game Designer.
The duration of the project was 3 weeks with a team of 5 members.

My duties included:

  • Designing various gameplay concepts, related to movement in space.
  • Game Scenario setup
  • Quality assurance and playtesting
  • Producing simple 3D space equipment models for the player to interact with.

Our goal was to find and test an intuitive way for the player to move around in VR through a large environment, without the use of disorientating techniques.
VR technology was just starting out at the time and most early projects used a form of teleportation to move the player around.
This felt a bit unnatural to us and something we wanted to improve, so this seemed like the perfect moment to experiment with this new technology.

Our biggest challenge was to find a way to move the player without causing any motion sickness.
We had to avoid sudden, disorientating camera movements and any special effects that distorted the player’s view.
Movement should feel natural, but there wasn’t a feasible way for us to have the player walk long distances.
Because of this limitation, we started to look into ways for the player to fly or hover using fun and natural interactions.

We started play-testing multiple concepts and eventually landed on the idea of using your arms to launch yourself forward.
It became apparent to us that it was more user-friendly to direct your arms opposite of the direction you want to go (example: Iron Man), instead of aiming where you want to go (example: Superman), because it lessens the strain on your arms and felt more fun and natural for our players to do.
To further emphasize and encourage this type of movement, we put the setting of this project in space and put hidden objects everywhere so that the player instantly recognizes that there is low gravity at play and that there are things to find if they explore.
The way the player has to push their body forward would also feel more straightforward in this setting.

I learned a lot about movement that feels natural in a VR setting thanks to the multiple tests we were able to do.
It was a fun experiment and I feel it really emphasized the importance of adding a fitting setting and a small goal for the player to substantially support the test of a mechanic.

On Space Flight VR, I was a Game Designer.
The duration of the project was 3 weeks with a team of 5 members.

My duties included:

  • Designing various gameplay concepts, related to movement in space.
  • Game Scenario setup
  • Quality assurance and playtesting
  • Producing simple 3D space equipment models for the player to interact with.

Our goal was to find and test an intuitive way for the player to move around in VR through a large environment, without the use of disorientating techniques.
VR technology was just starting out at the time and most early projects used a form of teleportation to move the player around.
This felt a bit unnatural to us and something we wanted to improve, so this seemed like the perfect moment to experiment with this new technology.

Our biggest challenge was to find a way to move the player without causing any motion sickness.
We had to avoid sudden, disorientating camera movements and any special effects that distorted the player’s view.
Movement should feel natural, but there wasn’t a feasible way for us to have the player walk long distances.
Because of this limitation, we started to look into ways for the player to fly or hover using fun and natural interactions.

We started play-testing multiple concepts and eventually landed on the idea of using your arms to launch yourself forward.
It became apparent to us that it was more user-friendly to direct your arms opposite of the direction you want to go (example: Iron Man), instead of aiming where you want to go (example: Superman), because it lessens the strain on your arms and felt more fun and natural for our players to do.
To further emphasize and encourage this type of movement, we put the setting of this project in space and put hidden objects everywhere so that the player instantly recognizes that there is low gravity at play and that there are things to find if they explore.
The way the player has to push their body forward would also feel more straightforward in this setting.

I learned a lot about movement that feels natural in a VR setting thanks to the multiple tests we were able to do.
It was a fun experiment and I feel it really emphasized the importance of adding a fitting setting and a small goal for the player to substantially support the test of a mechanic.

To exit your space vehicle, please proceed to break the glass and use your emergency axe.
ttl_03Media
ttl_movie
ttl_contents

Click on the pictures to read a description.
Each picture has a fun piece of information that explains more about the visuals and gameplay of this project.

ttl_movie
ttl_contents

Click on the pictures to read a description.
Each picture has a fun piece of information that explains more about the visuals and gameplay of this project.

ttl_movie
ttl_contents

Click on the pictures to read a description.
Each picture has a fun piece of information that explains more about the visuals and gameplay of this project.